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Trebbiano, or Trebbiano Toscano, is a rich white grape that is among the most planted varieties in the world. Originating in Italy, Trebbiano wine goes by a lot of different names. While the Trebbiano Toscano wine is more popularly grown in Tuscany. many other varieties are grown all over the country. As well as around different corners of the world.

Around twenty different grape varieties are genetically consistent with the profile of ‘Trebbiano’. All of them have their own unique specialties. It is not clear whether all these different types have descended from a common ancestor. There are broad similarities between many of them.

We’ll go over the taste, texture, and notes of the Trebbiano Toscano wine. It is the most commonly planted variant of the Trebbiano family. Lastly, if you like some wine with your dinner, we’ll list the best meals to pair a Toscano with.

What is Trebbiano?

As we touched upon earlier, the word ‘Trebbiano’ can refer to many different varieties of grapes. The one common feature of all of them is that they are all white grapes. The Roman scholar Pliny is thought to have written of the Trebbiano plant back in the Ancient Roman era. Bestowing proof of an illustrious tradition upon the grape that has survived evidently several centuries of change.

Today, the Trebbiano di Soave, Trebbiano Toscano Trebbiano Abruzzes, Trebbiano Spoletino, and the Trebbiano Valtenesi are only some examples of this grape that fall in the Trebbiano wine category. Despite being born in Italy, France actually produces much more of this grape than its European neighbor. This, along with its mention in the works of a Roman scholar, is a clear indicator of its popularity stretching fairly back in time.

Among the mentioned varieties, Trebbiano Toscano wine is one of the oldest, and the fifth most planted grape in the world by itself. As such, this article mainly focuses on the characteristics of this variant. Check out “Best Grapes for Making Wine” for a list of the different kinds of grapes that go into a bottle of wine.

What is Trebbiano Toscano?

Trebbiano Toscano goes by a lot of synonyms in different parts of the world. While the most prominent colloquial moniker for it in France and North America is Ugni Blanc, it also goes by Procanico, Burcanico, Santoro, Biancame, and Clairette Ronde, and many others in Italy. In Portugal, its called Talia, while Australians call it Heremitage.

Toscano is generally a dry, light to medium-bodied wine that contains hints of lemon, peach, citrus, and green apple. They are also highly acidic, and light on aromas. Besides the flavors that come with the grape, there are many other advantages of using this variety in wine production. It is resistant to many forms of disease. They act as a good base for brandies like Cognac, and they are also used to produce balsamic vinegar. As such, Trebbiano is an extremely versatile wine. It can also be paired with a wide variety of dishes for meals. We’ll cover this in the next section.

Take a look at “Can You Mix Red and White Wine?” for info on seeing if you can mix these two wines to make new tastes.

Pairing Trebbiano Toscano With Food

This type of wine goes best with lighter meals that are typically consumed earlier in one’s day. Pasta with light sauce, bruschettas, continental food, fish, these are all compatible choices with a Trebbiano Toscano. It’s no surprise that this wine goes best with simplistic meals like the ones from Italian cuisine, but it can also hold its own alongside rich meats like turkey. The high acidity of Toscano’s is efficient in complementing the richness of the texture of these meats.

Be sure to also check out “What Wine Goes With Salmon?” for pairing options and “List of Four Best Italian Table Wines” for more listings of similar wines to pair with your food.

Trebbiano, and especially the Toscano, is one of the world’s most planted white grape varieties for many good reasons.

Being a high yielding grape means that there are some sacrifices in flavor made in its production. The Toscano isn’t as fruity or floral as many other wines, but its subtle flavors still offer much worth contemplating. If you find yourself liking the Toscano, the many varieties of Trebbiano wine offer many choices to experiment with as well.

Thank you for reading with us today! Be sure to keep up with our UNCORKED series and check out “Uncorked: Auslese Riesling” for another great wine to choose from.

Wine on My Time is a resource blog for wine lovers all across the world! We take pride in delivering the best quality wine material for our readers. Check us out on Instagram and Pinterest for daily wine content!

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